Tag Archives: self-sufficiency

Yard Sales…The Thrill of Victory and the Agony of The Feet…

Here’s an archive post originally published March 30, 2010 (if you’ve received two notifications of this, I apologize – I’m reposting it for the second time today, because I don’t think the e-mail notifications worked the first time):

The best yard sale ad I ever saw was in a Moncton newspaper many years ago…it gave the pertinent details of the sale, followed by this: “Early birds will be ignored.”  My kind of vendor!  There’s nothing more frustrating than arriving at a sale at the advertised start time, only to find that vultures have picked all the best meat off the bones!

I’ve been going to yard sales/house sales/flea markets/auctions since I was small…we’d get up many Saturday mornings, and head for a nearby farm auction.  At one of these, my brother and I decided we’d really like to have a calf, but Dad convinced us that our mom would have a COW if he came home with one!  On Sunday drives, I remember us sitting in the car as Mom looked angrily at her watch waiting for Dad to stop talking to some stranger who had something to sell (my mom caught the yard sale bug much later in life, after she started collecting and selling Sherman jewellery).  In the late ’70’s, Dad started setting up his own stall at flea markets (he collected sealers and pretty much anything to do with farming, as well as books).

Forty years later, I still like calves, but don't really want one any more...

After I was married and had kids, going yard-saling was an inexpensive outing for a Saturday…we lived in Moncton and didn’t have a car then…we walked to all the sales we attended.  I’d set the alarm early, pack up the kids, and off we’d go, with a carefully-planned list of sales we wanted to get to and their start times.  I mostly bought books, clothes and toys then, although I would keep my eyes open for bells/wooden boxes for my mom’s collections.

We moved to Saint John in late 1997, and continued our yard-saling habit…since opening the bookstore in the summer of 2000, we also started looking for old/local books on our Saturday mornings.  We go to the Sussex Flea Market every summer, where over 1000 vendors set up outside to sell everything from antlers to zinnias.  I started training my middle daughter, Anna, how to “pick” old books at age 8, and today, at 15, she definitely has “the eye”…she knows what to take and what to leave behind!

I picked up this little book "Mary Queen of Scots" for 10 cents...it's listed online for $20!

I even yard-sale on vacation…I was in Belleville, Ontario for a college reunion, and went to a few sales in the east end where the beautiful old homes are.  Lying on the grass, I spied a beautiful Native Canadian print that I wanted as a gift for my best friend, who is of aboriginal descent.   As I leaned over to pick it up, someone with faster fingers snatched it out from under me…after shooting her a look that should have caused her to at least feel faint (it didn’t seem to have any effect), I let her have it…

I was tramping around the West Side of Saint John, when I found a gorgeous pen and ink drawing of a farmhouse – I liked it because it reminded me of my grandma’s house.  The problem was that it was huge – about 2′ x 3′, and I was on foot.  It was also in the most hideous frame I’d ever seen, with floral wallpaper acting as a homemade mat.  I asked the woman how much it was – $8!  I told myself that I would go to one more sale around the corner and then come back…if the drawing was still there, I’d buy it and call a cab to get home.  I was lucky that day…I forked over the money and took my prize home.  The next day, I called my friend, Amy, who has a frame shop on the West Side, Amy’s Custom Framing.  We made a barter deal for a proper frame and mat – $150 worth.  Amy did a beautiful job on the artwork, and I hung it over the fireplace in my living room.  I’ve never been able to determine the artist’s name – I assume it’s local though.

Since moving to Hammond River a little over a year ago, yard-saling has been more difficult…I don’t have a driver’s license, and Jim doesn’t like getting up early.  However, I was able to make the rounds at the Quispamsis Community Yard Sale last spring.  He even started to get into it, especially after one lady started giving us stuff!  I was buying a computer chair ($10) from her, and Jim had two routers ($2 each).  She pointed out the “free pile,” which contained a dehumidifier and two boxes of computer network cable that Jim said were sold retail for about $1 a foot!  We grabbed them!  Other finds that day were an apple peeler for $3; a gooseneck pole lamp for $5; two non-stick muffin pans for $1 each; a laptop bag for $2 for my stepdaughter, Brianna; a pair of Robeez baby shoes for $5 and a nursing pillow for $4 for my unborn granddaughter; and several books.  My daughters, Anna and Hope, got a High School Musical dance game.   Hope even picked up a stuffed teddy bear for our dog, Jake, which he wasted no time destroying!  A month or so later, we went to the Hampton Community Yard Sale, and got a good haul of books, but not much else.

"The best apple peeler ever!" according to my stepson, Devin...

I’m looking forward to the sales again this year…it will be a lot easier getting our purchases into the back of the van instead of the Corolla!
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Wood That I Could…

Here’s another one from the archives…it was originally published March 29, 2010 in the first week of my blog.  It’s almost firewood delivery time again…enjoy!

I’m not bragging when I say that we live in a BIG old house (it’s a good thing with seven people in the family).  Instead of building a new one when the family got bigger, they just added on.  Consequently, we have two kitchens, two living rooms, a dining room, a laundry room, five bedrooms, two full baths, and two half baths!  With a house this size and the price of electricity, we appreciate our ability to use our wood furnace for heat.

When we found the house in late October, 2008, there was no firewood left in the basement.  Jim’s parents, and sister and brother-in-law donated some downed trees/brush from their yards to get us started, but I spent the next two months calling every place I could find trying to get wood.  After an exceptionally wet spring and summer (and the death/retirement of a couple of suppliers), firewood was in short supply.  Finally, in late January, I found someone in St. Stephen (an hour-and-a-half away) who had dry wood.  I paid an arm and a leg, plus delivery charges, for two cords.  I asked them to bring it around the back to the basement door, so we could stack it inside.

We came home from work to find that the load had been delivered…however, it was dumped in our driveway (right in front of where we normally park the car).  When I called the supplier, he explained that they had tried to get to the basement, but had gotten stuck in the snow.

That weekend, we rounded up all four kids, my dad, a couple of wheelbarrows (one of which had a wonky wheel), and even a snow scoop, and began the task of transferring the wood from the driveway to the basement.  Each trip was down a hill and around a corner in snow about eight inches deep – countless times, the load would fall off on the way down.  After retrieving the fallen cargo, the wheelbarrow would be taken down a ramp and dumped in the basement for someone to stack.  On more than one occasion, taller people forgot to duck going in, and clocked themselves on low-hanging beams.  It was cold, too!  Getting the wood in took several days.

We were, however, very happy to see the drop in our power bill from January to February – it went from over $700 to less than half of that!

When spring came, we resolved not to be caught without wood again…we called a supplier in Sussex who advertised in the newspaper, and arranged a delivery of five cords in July.  The price per cord was better, and there wasn’t an extra delivery charge!  I repeated my instructions to bring the wood to the back of the house, and told him I would leave a cheque in the mailbox for him.

We arrived home from work on delivery day to find…you guessed it: five cords of wood in the middle of our driveway!  I almost cried!  Deep ruts in the yard indicated where the wood truck had gotten stuck in the mud trying to get to the basement.  “I’m sorry, ma’am, but I had to get another truck to pull me out!” Wally the wood guy told me afterwards.

About 3/4 of the woodpile where it was dumped, completely blocking our "roundabout" driveway...

Jim and I, and my dad, worked away at the pile over the next few weeks (the kids were too busy bouncing on the trampoline/playing on their computers to help!).  At least it was summer, and we didn’t have to haul it through the snow this time!  We enjoyed working together, although we soon found out how out of shape we were!  We ate ibuprofen like M & M’s!

This is me right after I lost my balance and fell into the woodpile...

The wood was good, but it was also infested with earwigs, which I found in the most unsuitable places in my house for weeks after the wood arrived!  Someone left a Brita water pitcher out on the counter…we found an earwig between the insert and the pitcher…ewww!

One of the pesky critters which were all over the house...

Since the wood was a bit wet, Jim used his technical skills to rig up an ingenious drying system using a dehumidifier and a fan placed strategically in the basement.  It was successful, and the wood burned well when it came time to start the furnace up again in October.

Jim and I stacking wood in the basement...

Wally the wood guy called me last month to set up delivery for this year.  We decided he would come with another five cords in July…we both hope he doesn’t get stuck again!

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Blackberry Cobbler and Light Bulb Tomatoes…

Note to readers:  I am rerunning the post below, which appeared in the early days of my blog, in honour of what would have been my Grandma’s 106th birthday today.  A former teacher, Grandma was an amazing woman: stoic and proud, and not at all touchy-feely…we knew she loved us because she fed us (I talked about her soft molasses cookies nearly as big as my head in another post)!  She sent every grandchild (there were 16 of us then) $2 on their birthdays, and kept up a regular written correspondence with me after we moved 500 miles away.  As far as I know, she probably never travelled more than 50 miles from her home in Logan County, Ohio, in her entire life.  Here’s a photo of her butter pat collection which was donated to the Logan County Museum after her death:

Grandma's Butter Pats...

Original post (March 25, 2010)

My paternal grandparents were great role models for how to live with very little…they lived on a number of small farms in Ohio, raising all their own vegetables, eggs, and sometimes meat.  Grandma made all their bread as well, in a huge, dark brown stoneware bowl.  Their last farm before Grandpa died was a sheep farm…they also had a couple of goats.  This farm had a cold water tap in the kitchen, but hot water was heated in a large kettle on top of the stove.  Baths were taken in a copper boiler.  The outhouse was a dilapidated wooden structure (2 holes as I recall) where one used the pages of the Bellefontaine Examiner (torn into small pieces) as toilet paper.  Every bed had a chamber pot tucked under it for the night.  I remember Grandma squeezing the water out of her beige, opaque stockings with the handcranked wringer washer, and the clothesline full of freshly washed laundry.  There were at least seven rocking chairs in the house, of varying styles and ages.

To save gas, my Grandpa used to turn off the car, put it in neutral, and coast down the hills (there are a lot in Central Ohio).  I remember Grandma washing every piece of aluminum foil and putting it in a drawer to reuse.  She was also a string saver.  The radio was the only electrical form of entertainment – there was no TV.  The shelves of a big cabinet in the living room were stocked with books, board games (Monopoly, Anagrams, and Pit), puzzles (which Grandpa and I did together), and scrap paper for drawing on.   On the bottom shelf, Grandma’s diaries (one for each year since the 1930’s) were arranged in chronological order.  There was never much juicy information in them, mostly weather and trivia about relatives/neighbours I didn’t know, although Grandma also used to record gardening details: “Planted peas today.”  Grandma was the one who taught me how to crochet when I was five, using old stockings for practice chaining.

When I was small, I used to love going out to the chicken house with Grandma to collect the eggs…I still fondly remember the smell of the chickens.  We would put the big brown eggs in a wicker basket and carry them into the house, with Laddie the collie following close at our heels.

Another favourite task was going into the garden to harvest…Grandma grew many exotic things not in my daily suburban diet: zucchini and other kinds of squash, cabbage, and little yellow tomatoes shaped like light bulbs.  Those were the best: we would pop them into our mouths, where the juice and seeds would explode into a sweet taste sensation!  It was my Grandma who used to cut cabbage into slices and spread peanut butter on them for an afternoon snack (I still love that today!).

Light Bulb Tomatoes

In the woods near the house, there were hundreds of wild blackberry bushes.  I never met a berry I didn’t like, but blackberries are my absolute favourite!  For dessert, Grandma would make a biscuit dough, bake it, and then cover it with berries.  We’d pour a little milk on it, and voila! – blackberry cobbler!  Another treat was her molasses cookies – soft morsels almost as big as our heads which she stacked in round cardboard Quaker Oats containers.

We ate our meals at Grandma’s house on transferware dishes – I remember the square, deep-dish plates of random colours and patterns…I wish I had a couple of them today!  Grandma was never much for fancy stuff, but she did have a large collection of butter pats, which was donated to the local museum when she died.  She enjoyed showing us her new acquisitions when we visited.

Dishes similar to Grandma's

My Grandpa was killed in a car accident in 1974, and Grandma sold the farm and moved to an apartment in town.  She still planted a garden, and we still enjoyed many meals at her house.  She died after a short bout with colon cancer in 1987.

I never forgot about light bulb tomatoes – last year, we went all over New Brunswick looking for plants, but no one had them!  This year, I was very excited to find heirloom seeds for them in the Hope Seeds catalogue (see “Companies I Like” for link).  I will plant them in memory of my grandparents.  I have a secret blackberry patch that I go back to every summer, and pick berries…I think of Grandma every time we eat them!

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My Blogging (Half) Birthday…

Half Birthday Cake...

Six months ago today, I wrote my Virgin Post, and the entity known as Herding Cats in Hammond River was born.  I started my blog as a way of getting back into writing after a three-year hiatus, and as a motivational tool to help me achieve goals.  One of those goals was to grow some of our own food…that happened.  Another one was to become more self-sufficient, and stop buying so much “stuff” (that didn’t happen!).  Here are some of the things I’ve learned in the last six months:

1. The blogging community is full of incredible people…I have lots of them on my Blogroll (check out He Said/She Said at right side).  These folks are not only talented writers, but caring human beings who provide support to others, especially when times are tough.  They are my biggest cheerleaders (and sometimes, toughest critics), and I’m so happy to have made their online acquaintances!

2. Having a blog is like having a child…it needs care and attention, and sometimes other family members get jealous!  Like children, a blog is a product of its mother/father, who often reveal their deepest thoughts and feelings to the world.  Bloggers are some of the bravest people out there.

3. I really love comments…they’re my “pay” for writing this blog…I do this as much for you as I do for myself!  If you like (or don’t like) something, please take a second to let me know!  I always respond to comments…I care what you think!

4. The number of people who subscribe to my blog is slowly increasing, but not fast enough for me…I want more!  If you like my blog, please hit the “E-Mail Subscription” button…it’s under my mug shot, and says: “Sign me up!”  You can also subscribe to the RSS feed (button to the right of the title).

5. Even though I’ve posted 115 times, I still don’t know what people are going to react to…it’s an interesting (and sometimes scary) process to hit the “publish” button and send your words out into cyberspace!  I apologize (again) to anybody I’ve offended…

6. I seem to be incapable of writing short posts (less than 500 words).  If I don’t have more than 500 words to contribute on a given day, I’d rather not bother.  As a word lover, I feel that it’s my duty to spew out use as many interesting words as possible (properly and correctly spelled, of course, grammar fanatic that I am!).

7. I find that writing about different topics keeps me stimulated (wait, is that a squirrel over there?).  I hope that my blog’s lack of focus “variety” is stimulating for my readers as well.  I get a lot of my best blog ideas at night… 

8.  I endeavour not to waste my reader’s time (I recently read a blog post about the advantages of plastic cutlery over regular silverware – there’s two minutes of my life I’ll never get back).  If I write about something silly, I guarantee it will at least be amusing!

9.  In my Virgin Post, I stated, “I’m hoping that this blog will help keep me from procrastinating.”  Ironically, I often use my blog as an excuse not to do other things, like laundry!

10. I’m grateful to my family for allowing me to tell strangers what they’ve been doing.  Also, thanks to my resident photographers, Jim and Anna, for letting me use their pictures!

Thank you to everyone who takes the time to read these “musings of a matriarch.”  I plan to keep this up as long as time/energy/enthusiasm permits!

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Pickin’ and Grinnin’…Take Two…

The thankful receiver bears a plentiful harvest.”  William Blake

Back in April, I wrote a post about how much I liked to pick things…pretty much anything that grows (https://writerwoman61.wordpress.com/2010/04/07/pickin-and-grinnin/).

Well, I’ve been living my dream for the last few weeks…it’s been fun and a little bit overwhelming at times!   

We’ve been eating salad greens, spinach, beet greens, and Swiss Chard for weeks now…I think I overdid the salad greens a bit.  A lot of them have gone to seed without being totally used  (Anna took the pictures for me).

Swiss Chard...

Beets...

Leaf Lettuce (my legs in the background)

Mixed Lettuce...

More Lettuce...

Tat Soi Greens Gone to Seed...

Last night, I picked blueberries, peas, and green beans.  I find it fascinating that even though I often don’t see well, I don’t have any trouble locating a ripe blueberry down behind big clumps of leaves!

My "eagle eyes" spotted these ripe blueberries...

I’m planning to make blueberry crisp with these: 

Bowl of blueberries picked in two harvests...

Here are the peas I picked:

Bowl of Peas...

The beans seem to be in a bit of a dormant period right now…only got one mixing bowlful last night – will give those to Jim’s mom tonight.  I already have eight bags in the freezer (and gave several to Kaylee and Scott too).

A couple of beans that I missed last night...

I have to watch the Scarlet Runner beans…if I miss a bean, it grows to be a foot long…the pods are fuzzy and tough, too!

Scarlet Runner Beans...this post is about six feet high...

 

I can’t wait until these pods dry and we can harvest fava beans!

Fava Bean pod...

We still have lots to look forward to picking later…here’s a picture of my “tomato jungle” …I badly need some stakes!

Tomato Jungle...

Plum Tomatoes...

These tomatoes will be yellow, eventually...

The rutabagas have really taken off…they’re pushing the Blue Jay beans to the side (I planted them between the bean plants).

Rutabagas...

 

I hope to have florets on this broccoli some day…

Broccoli...

The purple Brussels sprouts are still plugging away…

Purple Brussels Sprouts...

 

The poor bug-nibbled cucumbers are starting to come back…

At this rate, we might have cucumbers by September...

We’ll have a few pumpkins…

Pumpkin Blossoms...

We’ve got lots of squash:

Squash patch...

 

Winter Squash Blossom...

 

Baby Winter Squash...

 

Zucchini Blossom...

 I can hardly wait to make chocolate zucchini bread!

I’m really excited that my sunflowers are starting to open…they’re taller than I expected, and really beautiful colours!

Sunflower...

 

Sunflower Closeup...these heads are only about five inches across, but they look huge in this picture!

I’m going out this morning to pull out some of the greens that have gone to seed, and do some much needed weeding!  If you’re looking for me, I’ll be in my garden!

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Gorgeous Greenery…How My Garden Grows…

Fava Bean Blossoms...

Here are the promised photos from my garden, courtesy of one of my resident photographers, Jim.

The fava bean blossoms above are quite unusually-coloured…beans will be light brown when I get them.

Scarlet Runner Bean Blossoms...

These bean plants are supposed to grow 6 – 10 feet high…Dad pounded some poles in for them the other night.

Chinese Cabbage...

 My Chinese cabbage is doing well…regular green cabbage looks good too!

Mennonite Purple Stripe Runner Beans...

 We’re going to have a freezerful of pretty beans this summer!

Pea Blossoms...

My peas are thriving…already a couple of feet high and clinging to the strings Dad installed for them.

Yin-Yang Bean Blossoms...

 Strange…the black and white beans have plain white blossoms…

Blue Jay Bean Blossoms...

 More colourful beans!

Bull's Blood Beet Greens...

These are pretty sparse…luckily, Dad planted beets in his part of the garden too!

Front - Mild Mix Greens, Back - Tat Soi Greens...

If you look closely, you can see the holes in the leaves where the bugs have been munching them…we’ve already had several salads.

Silverbeet Swiss Chard...

 Not much Swiss chard either…Jim loves that!

Mixed Lettuce...

The mixed lettuce is almost ready to start picking…pretty contrast between dark and light…

Tomatoes Planted From Seed in Late May...

I’m hopeful that I’ll have some heirloom tomatoes after all (bought some plants as a backup just in case, but they’re neither heirloom nor organic!

Autumn Beauty Sunflowers...

The pesky critters have been chewing holes in the sunflower leaves too, but it doesn’t seem to bother them.

Pea Pods...

 Today, I was delighted to discover these pea pods on my Sugar Ann peas!

Scarlet Nantes Carrots...

These carrots are smaller than they look (about 3 inches high)…planted them between the pea plants.

Rutabagas?

I think this is rutabaga, but I’m not sure…Jim was snapping so many photos, I kind of lost track!

Cauliflower...

This is definitely cauliflower!

Not pictured: pumpkins, squash, cucumbers (their leaves look like demented doilies – they’ve been ravaged by insects); purple brussels sprouts, broccoli, bunching onions (forgot to photograph them); purchased tomato/pepper/chive plants (cheating!); spinach (last year’s gone to seed).

I’m optimistic that we’ll have good results from our garden this year…we could all benefit from more vegetables in our diets!

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It’s All About Me…

I have been writing this blog for almost three months…many people who read it have never met me.  Some know me on a superficial level, and others are family members who haven’t seen me for years…

After receiving a negative comment about something I wrote (sent in a private e-mail), I felt it necessary to let folks know more about the “real me.” (the title is tongue-in-cheek).  Forgive me if I repeat myself from previous blogs.  These are in no particular order:

1. I am honest to a fault…I will never lie to you (and believe most other people are too – I believe most of what people tell me).  By the same token, my tongue (or keyboard) sometimes moves faster than my brain – I sometimes say things that could be hurtful without thinking about the consequences. 

2. I take everything personally…this is why I chose not to pursue journalism.  I was way too sensitive!  I want everyone to like me!

3. I see only colours and shapes without correction…I’ve been wearing really thick glasses since I was 6.  It’s a good thing my hearing is sharp!

4. I have been working since I was 10, and started my first business at age 11. 

5. I was a single mom with three children for ten years.  Other than three weeks on public assistance, I was financially independent during that time.  As a mother of girls, I have always taught them (as my mother taught me) never to depend on anyone else for money! 

6. I have a congenital hip defect that means my left leg is longer than the right one (up to 2″ difference at one point)…I went through school having to wear a lift on my right shoe.  I have had two surgeries to try to correct the problem.  The legs still aren’t the same length, but I’m not going to let them cut bone!

7. I am distantly related to the famous Beecher family on my mom’s side.  They were strong abolitionists…I have always had a strong interest in civil rights, and have a good knowledge of the Civil War time period.

8. I have trouble walking and chewing gum at the same time.  However, I’ve never broken a bone.  I did go through a glass door once when I was seven – that was five stitches, and hours of people pulling glass shards out of me with tweezers.

9. I taught myself to read at age 3…I still love to read.  I wish everyone could read!

10. I became a Canadian citizen (with the rest of my family) in 1982.  I am a dual citizen of Canada and the U.S.

11. I really like to cook and bake…I feed people I love!  I hate cleaning up afterward (I’m a terrible housekeeper).

12. I have never smoked or experimented with drugs…I like to be in control of my faculties (I’ve only ever been drunk once in my life…I didn’t like it, so I never did it again!). 

13. My family and friends are my most precious assets.  I will fight anything or anyone who threatens them!

14. I chose not to go to university, because if I’d applied for a student loan, my parents were expected to make a financial contribution to the cost of my education…they didn’t have the money, and I wasn’t asking for it.  I paid my own tuition at community college.

15. I am stubborn, sometimes to the point of stupidity (after one of the surgeries mentioned in #6, I insisted on going out for Hallowe’en with my leg in a cast from crotch to ankle – I used my crutches to haul myself up and down the 1/4- mile long driveways in our neighbourhood).  I hate asking for help (that’s the stoic German in me)!

16. I don’t have a driver’s license.  I had my temporary permit when I was eighteen, but never took the test…as an adult, I never had a car and depended on my feet, buses and taxis to get around the cities I lived.  I know I can drive, but frankly, cars go a lot faster now than thirty years ago! 

17. I spend a lot of time promoting businesses that treat me well.  But, if I am treated badly, I will never go back.  I will also tell everyone I know about my bad experience. 

18. I have spent a lot of my adult life as an activist.  I have served on the boards of many community organizations including: the Kidney Foundation of Canada, CH.A.D.D. Canada (Children and Adults with Attention Deficit Disorder), the Midtown Residents Association (Moncton), the Saint John Women’s Conference, and the Business Community Anti-Poverty Initiative.  As a business owner, I was on the boards of the Atlantic Home-Based Business Network (Moncton), and the Saint John West Business Association.

19. I am a huge procrastinator…I always crammed for exams at the last minute (and pulled off A’s!).

20. I would never intentionally hurt anyone (unless they were hurting someone in my family – see #13).

21. My favourite number is 27.  I don’t know why.

22. My sun sign is Cancer…I have pretty well all the traits associated with that sign.   

23. I find walking over bridges with moving water underneath really scary.

24. I like bugs that don’t bite.

25. I can’t stand loud, unnecessary noise of any kind. 

26. I do not attend church, and haven’t on a regular basis since I was 11.  I treat other people as I wish to be treated, and go out of my way to be helpful – I think that’s what God wants us all to do.  People who try to push their religion on me make me extremely uncomfortable, and I avoid them if I can.  My beliefs are my business (as long as they “do no harm” – there are a lot of abhorrent things done in the name of organized religion).

27. It bothers me a great deal that people who steal in North America often receive longer prison sentences than those who hurt or kill other people.

28. I don’t like to sit and do nothing.  I like to be busy all the time, even if it’s just reading a book.  I don’t react well to my schedule being derailled by events beyond my control.

29. I am up at 5:30 every morning (I sleep until 8 on weekends), and in bed by 11:00 at the latest…I have always been a morning person.

30. I am an organ donor.  One of my cousins passed away in the early 90’s after waiting too long for a liver transplant.  I would urge all of my readers to consider being a donor.  There are far too many people waiting for far too few organs…you won’t need them after you’re gone!

I hope that this random list has helped you to get a better picture of what makes me tick…thank you for taking the time to read it!

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